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Signs of Stress in Dogs: Is your dog stressed?

Signs of Stress in Dogs: Is your dog stressed?

This infographic, 20 signs of stress in Dogs, is provided by topdogtips.com click on the link to read, more detailed information.

Some of these signs may also indicate some other underlying health or behavioural issues (same as with any human illness), so keep it all, in context.

Dogs like to know where they are in the scheme of things, they are happy when they have rules, boundaries, routine, exercise, fun, consistency and a space to call their own. The lack or change to any of the above can cause problems for them. All animals speak to us, including dogs, if we as humans, choose to watch, listen and learn.

Signs-of-Stress-in-Dogs-1

 

 

 
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Posted by on November 22, 2018 in About

 

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Boarding Kennel Stress in Dogs: Things Owners Need to Know!

Boarding Kennel Stress in Dogs: Things Owners Need to Know!

I originally wrote this article in 2014, it is now November 2018. I keep an eye on the stats and search terms and the number of views have increased greatly. In fact I would have to say “Boarding Kennel Stress in Dogs: Things owners need to know!” is one of my most viewed (181,966) and read articles to date.

The search terms, phrases and words have stayed, very consistent.  It goes without saying, the more traffic the more views but for people to seek out and read this article, does mean, people are still having issues and concerns over boarding kennel facilities and their dog’s welfare, worldwide.

In my opinion, one of the major problems, is anyone can open a boarding kennels or doggy day care, these people may have good intentions and love dogs but having a love of dogs isn’t enough. They need to understand dog behaviour, dog safety and do their research on how to set up and run a good facility. They also need to have a good training program in place for their employees, if they employ staff.

Pet parents on the other hand, need to do their research, and don’t take things for granted, after all they trust the facility will take care of their pets, while they are away. Pet parents should also do some work, by introducing their pets to a boarding facility, before they need to use one. Instead of leaving things to the last minute because dog/cats need to be acclimatized. Day or night stays are a great way of doing this. This also means pet parents will have an opportunity, to check out facilities. 

Below is the original article I wrote in 2014 

Again here is another aspect of Dog Safety that seriously needs to be looked at. For many these days, the word supervise means just keeping an eye on the dogs as they are walking around doing other things, which is not good enough!

Boarding kennel stress is real! Dogs become stressed the same as you and I and putting your dog into boarding kennels, can be very stressful for them. Imagine taking a young child to a strange place and leaving it with people it doesn’t know. The child will more often than not, become distressed and upset. The same thing can and does happen to dogs.

Even steady dogs can become stressed when confronted by new surroundings, change of diet and routine. Let alone being put into a kennel they are unfamiliar with, surrounded by strange smells and other dogs, some of which, maybe barking.

Often, owners don’t realize or it never occurs to them, that their dog may become stressed under these conditions, especially, if signs of stress aren’t noticed in their home environment or when they are out and about. A boarding kennel environment can be especially hard on nervy, fearful, anxious or dog aggressive dogs. It can also be hard on dogs from the same household, if they are not used to being separated, being alone or being away from their owner. Some dogs who have never been in kennels before in their life, find kenneling very restrictive. Then there are some dogs who just need more space than others. Separation related issues in dogs are on the increase and do impact on a dogs behaviour.

Many kennels these days and I do the same, ask if your dog has been in kennels before, if not day/night stays are recommended, prior to boarding. So start conditioning your dog early, be proactive, even if you are not going away, introduce your dog to a boarding kennel environment. Dogs need to have good experiences again a bad experience can impact on their behaviour.

Signs of kennel stress can manifest in dogs in many ways:

Aggression: often due to fear, dog cannot be handled by anyone other than the owner (may need a few short visits so your dog gets used to being handled by someone else)

Excessive barking & whining: it’s a sign the dog is distressed and it also very unsettling for the other dogs

Loss of appetite: not eating, due to stress and/or change of diet. Change of diet, may also cause vomiting and diarrhea

Constant licking of the lips: dogs do that to try to calm themselves down

Pacing & Depression: Some dogs who have never been confined before may try to break out by throwing themselves against the walls or door of the kennel.

What you the owner can do to make your dog’s stay less stressful and more enjoyable

1. Condition your dog to going into kennels, day stays at a boarding kennel are a good way of getting your dog used to it. If you have a kennel and run at home or some other form of containment, such as a garage, small bedroom or  a dog crate, use it.

2. If you are a multi dog household make sure your dogs are independent of each other and can cope on their own. Separate kenneling or confinement goes along way, in helping with that. Doesn’t mean that they can’t hangout together, just means they are ok with being alone. The same goes for dogs who are too attached to their owner, they too need to be made independent.

3. Visit facilities, talk to the kennel owner, are they knowledgeable and friendly do they understand dogs and dog behaviour. Just because they run a boarding facility, doesn’t mean they understand dogs and dog behaviour.

If you have a nervy, anxious or dog aggressive dog or a dog who just needs space. Ask if the kennel owner is experienced in handling these types of dogs and can accommodate them.

Introducing these dogs to kennels may take a bit more time on the part of you the owner and the boarding kennel owner. Some kennels may not take them because they are not set up to do so. Also certain breeds of dogs, may not be welcome.

4. To make your dogs stay less stressful and more comfortable, ask if you can bring a blanket or toy etc of theirs.

5. Ask how your dog will be exercised, some kennels walk the dogs, others let them out to run in large compounds with other dogs.

If they are let out to run with other dogs, ask if they are supervised in other words is there, someone physically present, “standing  & watching”, while the dogs are being exercised.

Even friendly dogs can fall out and a dogfight may ensue, also signs of stress, distress & bullying maybe missed, so it is important, that someone is standing there watching, with their Eyes Wide Open at all times. (Refer AsureQuality Ltd Kennel Code of Practice).

Also, ask if they exercise small and big dogs together in groups. Small & Big dogs should not be exercised together, they both should have their own exercise areas. Some big dogs may see small dogs as prey, so there is a possibility, they could chase and kill them.

Be aware some kennels leave dogs to run together unsupervised. In other words, there isn’t anyone watching them all the time, while they are out running around.

So don’t just ask, if the dogs are supervised while running together, ask if “someone is physically present,” all the time, while the dogs are being exercised.

Also, read the boarding kennel contract before you sign. Most state that they are not liable for anything that happens to your dog while in kennels. Which is fair enough because they are running a business but the risk can be reduced if there is someone watching with their Eyes Wide Open for signs of distress, aggression, stress etc if dogs are let out to run in groups.

After all, when dog and cat owners for that matter, place their pets in these establishments, they trust that they have their pets best interests at heart.

Click on the links below to read what can happen, when dogs are left unsupervised.

Auckland dog daycare shuts down following death

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/9127003/Couple-furious-after-pet-mauled

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/cap-pelé-kennel-owner-negligent-after-dog-fatally-attacked-1.2793484

If your dog is Nervy, anxious, dog aggressive or a dog who just need some space, ask if your dog can be individually exercised.If your dog is anxious or nervy, please read tips for boarding anxious/nervy dogs

6. If your dog is on a special diet or needs medication ask if the kennel will feed the diet required or dispense medication.

7. Also ask what food the kennel feeds the dogs and ask if it would be possible for you to bring your own dogs food, so his/her diet remains the same.

8. Read socializing your dog, the right way
Incorrect socializing even in a boarding kennel environment can and does lead to behaviour problems in dogs, such as aggression or timidness.
I hope the above information helps you the dog owner to make an informed decision.

Copyright 2014

Elayne Hand

Zerobites Dog Training

 
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Posted by on November 3, 2018 in About

 

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Boarding Kennel Stress in Dogs: Be a proactive dog owner, Things Dog Owners need to do, to help make their dogs stay, in a boarding kennels, a happy one

Boarding Kennel Stress in Dogs: Be a proactive dog owner, Things Dog Owners need to do, to help make their dogs stay, in a boarding kennels, a happy one

I originally wrote this article back in January 2014, I monitored the number of views and for 2014  I received a total  10844 views on both of my articles “Boarding Kennel Stress in Dogs: Things owners need to know!” & “Tips for boarding anxious/nervy dogs” there seems to be a lot of concerned owners out there. Dog Owners need to be proactive when it comes to boarding their dog, you may have a great time away but your dog may not.

Unfortunately, even now, it still never ceases to amaze me, how many dog owners ring me and ask if I have room to board their dog and their dog has never been in kennels before. (since writing this article, I no longer board dogs)

Dogs need to be introduced to a kennel environment early on, not at the last-minute a few days before you go on holiday. Separation Anxiety and related problems are on the increase. I am personally seeing more & more dogs with these issues and they unfortunately can be one of the hardest behaviour problems to fix.

All too often dogs are treated like babies and can become over reliant on their human family, that goes for big dogs as well as small dogs. Dogs like children, need to become independent and be able to happily function on their own. If you have a multiple dog household the same applies. Dogs should be equally happy to hangout with each other or be on their own. Again, same as people.

So be proactive and introduce your dog to a kennel environment early on. Below is a list of things, dog owners need to do, to help their dogs stay in kennels, be a happy one.

1. If your dog has never been in kennels before condition your dog to going into kennels, day stays at a boarding kennel are a good way of getting your dog used to it. If you have a kennel and run at home or some other form of containment, such as a garage, small bedroom or  a dog crate, use it.

2. If you are a multi dog household make sure your dogs are independent of each other and can cope on their own. Separate kenneling or confinement goes along way, in helping with that. Doesn’t mean that they can’t hangout together, just means they are ok with being alone. The same goes for dogs who are too attached to their owner, they too need to be made independent.

3. Visit facilities, talk to the kennel owner, are they knowledgeable and friendly do they understand dogs and dog behaviour. Just because they run a boarding kennel, doesn’t mean they understand dogs or dog behaviour.

If you have a nervy, anxious or dog aggressive dog or a dog who just needs space. Ask if the kennel owner is experienced in handling these types of dogs and can accommodate them. Introducing these dogs to kennels may take a bit more time on the part of you the owner and the boarding kennel owner. (Ask how they go about introducing these types dogs to a kennel environment) Some kennels may not take them because they are not set up to do so. Also certain breeds of dogs, may not be welcome.

4. To make your dogs stay less stressful and more comfortable, ask if you can bring a blanket or toy etc of theirs.

5. Ask how your dog will be exercised, some kennels walk the dogs, others let them out to run in large compounds with other dogs. If they are let out to run with other dogs, ask if they are supervised in other words is someone physically present, while the dogs are being exercised. Even friendly dogs can fall out and a dogfight may ensue, Also signs of stress or distress need to be watched out for, so it is important that dogs are supervised, at all times.(Refer AsureQuality Limited, Pet Boarding Establishments,Kennel Code of Practice). Don’t be afraid to ask the hard questions.

Click on the link to read what can happen if dogs are left unsupervised: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/9127003/Couple-furious-after-pet-mauled
Be aware some kennels leave dogs to run unsupervised.

If your dog is Nervy, anxious, dog aggressive or a dog who just need some space, ask if your dog can be individually exercised.If your dog is anxious or nervy, please read tips for boarding anxious/nervy dogs

6. If your dog is on a special diet or needs medication ask if the kennel will feed the diet required or dispense medication.

7. Also ask what food the kennel feeds the dogs and ask if it would be possible for you to bring your own dogs food, so his/her diet remains the same.

8. Read Socialising your dog, the right way
Incorrect socialising even in a boarding kennel environment can and does lead to behaviour problems in dogs, such as aggression or timidness.
I hope the above information helps you the dog owner to make an informed decision.

 
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Posted by on August 16, 2018 in About

 

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How to Introduce dogs and cats to each other

Zues

Zues

I have had a few inquiries lately on how to introduce cats and dogs. So I thought I would repost this article.

The ideal way of course is to have both the puppy and kitten grow up together. Dogs and cats can become great friends but just like with people, there are some who may not get along, no matter what you try to do. I have both cats and dogs and yes some play well together and some don’t.

It can take a while for your cat and dog to become used to being around each other, there are no quick fixes, it could take weeks or even months. One of the main things not to do, is try to force your cat and dog to meet each other, they have to do it on their own terms. Both the cat and dog need their own space, somewhere safe where they can go. A dog crate is ideal for your dog and the cats need a bolt hole too, such as another room or the like.

When first introducing your dog to your cat, make sure the cat is safe in another room and your dog is on the leash, you must have control of the situation, so you need to be confident in what you are doing as there really is no room, for human error.

If your dog isn’t great at listening or focusing on you, work needs to be done, obedience training and enrichment games such as Canine Parkour will help with that. You need to have your dogs full attention.

So now it begins, let your cat out of the room and let it wander around, you should have your dog on a lead and focusing on you, have it sit, if your dog starts jumping around make it sit and tell it to Leave It” if it starts barking tell it to be “Quiet” if that doesn’t work, try some water and vinegar in a squirt bottle. Squirt it in your dogs face. The dog crate is also a useful tool, crate your dog and let the cat in the room to wander around.  You have to be watching all the time in other words no distractions. If your dog starts barking you can also cover the crate so the dog can’t see, until it calms down. Depending on your circumstances the introductions may have to be little and often. If you are out all day, never leave the cat and dog home alone together. Make sure they are both safe and away from each other.

After a few weeks of constant and consistent training, you maybe able to let your dog off the leash or out of the crate with a muzzle on and watch how the cat and dog interact.

Some may think this is harsh or not fair on the dog but its better than finding your cat dead. Even after all this training, your dog and cat maybe ok when you are around but when you are not around, all bets are off.

I personally have a dog in the house with me, who killed a cat in his past life before he came to live with me, that was why he was rehomed.

My cat has grown up with dogs but it took her 3 weeks before she even came to check Zues out. I used the crate or put him in the kennel when I was’t around. After quite a long time they lost interest in each other,

I corrected Zues every time he even looked at my cat the wrong way. Now I can leave both of them, home alone together. They are not friends but they tolerate each other and both have their own space. I have on occasion caught them sleeping together, if you can call it that, Zues at one end of his couch and Turbo at the other.

Here are a couple of good articles, one written by Ed Fawley, from Leerburg Dog Training and the other by HEART animal rescue and adoption team Inc

Introducing Dogs or Puppies into Homes with Cats by Ed Fawley

Introducing a new cat to Pets  by HEART

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2016 in About

 

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Lets get real, Is the dog really to blame?

Lets get real, Is the dog really to blame?

Well, I feel like I am a broken record saying the same thing over and over again, when it comes to Dog Safety and how to stay safe around dogs.

The reported dog attacks over the last few weeks here in NZ, are certainly a cause for concern but are the dogs really to blame? Easier to blame the dog than the owner or the person who was supposed to be supervising because they can’t stand up for themselves and tell their side of the story.  Dogs don’t just bite, most bites are the caused by inappropriate behaviour by adults and children   as well as people not seeing and reading the dogs warning signs. All too often the dog pays the price, with its life.

77% of dog bites come from the family dog or a friends dog and a good percentage of the victims are children. Many, not all, of these bites stem from inappropriate greetings and play as well as, dogs being generally put in, bad situations

While it may be good the media report and highlight these instances they fuel the fire but we “the public” very rarely get to hear the full story.

In my opinion, there are 3 things which have greatly contributed to the rise in dog bites/attacks over the last few years in both children and adults. 77% of dog bites come from the family dog or a friends dog and a good percentage of the victims are children. Many, not all, of these bites result from inappropriate greetings and play.

1. Human Complacency.

People feel too comfortable & secure and don’t see or are unaware/oblivious to the potential dangers living with a dog can bring. Dogs have been put on a pedestal, too much is expected of them. They have to act and behave and be good dogs, in any given situation. As if humans would do the same, if the roles were reversed. Dogs are not human they don’t think the same as we do, they need to be treated with respect and understanding. After all we are living with an animal that can move faster than us in everyway, who has teeth that can do a lot of damage and in many cases is stronger than us.  If I were not talking about a dog but another animal, say a Tiger, Horse or even a Cat, would people be so complacent?

2.  A she’ll-be-right attitude, which is quite self explanatory

3. People looking but not seeing.

Lack of supervision, supervision for many  these days means taking a quick glance around at what the dog, kids or other adults are doing while chatting on the phone. working on the computer, having coffee with friends maybe even in another room, going for a walk with your dog and not paying attention to what is going on around you. The list is endless. If you can’t be watching 100% of the time, its quite easy to remove the dog or person/people from the situation, and if you are out walking, leash your dog.

By looking and not seeing, you are not seeing if your dog is, being teased, harassed, bullied or is or is frightened, stressed or distressed. All animals talk to us including dogs, (via body language) if we choose to watch and listen. As humans, we won’t tolerate being teased, harassed or bullied, so why should dogs?  As humans, we may feel frightened, stressed or distressed at times and what do we do?   We seek help, comfort, support, so why not help, comfort and support, dogs. After all they are supposed to be mans best friend, so dog owners need to become educators  so they can teach others including non dog owners, how to act, behave and communicate, when in the company of their dog or anyone else’s.

So what do dogs need from us? they need love, boundaries, rules, guidance, protection, consistency and a safe place to call their own, a place they can go, to have a break, from kids, you, your friends, other dogs and to just chill. They need time spent with them on a daily basis. They need you to understand them and stand up for them, when they are unhappy, stressed, frightened or are being teased, harassed or bullied. They need you to look and see and not to be complacent, and not to be afraid to say NO to that child or adult or even another dog & owner, if their behaviour is unacceptable. Remember, dog owners its ok to say “NO”

Always remember, its your dog, your house, your rules and when you are out its your dog your rules.

These days there is a lot of information about dog safety out there and there is no real reason why people should not be, well informed. I often hear “my dog is good with kids” (maybe be good with your kids but not someone else’s) “my dog won’t bite”(any dog will bite given the right set of circumstances) “my dog is a good dog” even good dogs bite if they are teased, hit, abused or put in a bad situation.

I personally hand out dog safety information along with the training FAQ sheets to all my clients. If they are new expectant parents I cover that also. I find myself now teaching people how to protect themselves when they are out walking, with or without their dog, from unwanted attention from off leash dogs, which in reality, I shouldn’t have to  be doing.

If we want to turn the tide and reduce the number of dog bites/attacks maybe its time that all dog trainers/behaviourists, training clubs, vets who run puppy schools, private trainers, SPCA, Rescues, Schools and Plunket get on board and provide basic dog safety information to their clients, children and parents. All people, (children & adults)) whether they are dog owners or not, need to know how to act and behave when in the company of dogs. All dogs speak to us, if we choose to watch and listen.

 
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Posted by on May 9, 2016 in About

 

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What Parents, Educators & Dog Owners should know and be able to tell & teach adults & children, on how to act and behave when in the company of dogs. Most dog bites are preventable.

What Parents, Educators & Dog Owners should know and be able to tell & teach adults & children, on how to act and behave when in the company of dogs. Most dog bites are preventable.

77% of dog bites are caused by the family dog or a friends dog. Dogs are dogs not substitute human children and all have the potential to harm. While they make great companions and are a lot of fun, people often, feel too secure and comfortable when in the company of them and don’t see or are oblivious to the potential dangers.

After all you are living/interacting  with an animal, that is quicker/faster than you, in every way, has sharp teeth that can do a lot of damage and in a lot of cases, is stronger.

If I were describing another animal, say for instance, a Tiger,  would you feel as secure and comfortable in the company of one them, of course you wouldn’t, because they have the potential to harm or kill you. You would be very aware, safety and knowing how to act and behave, would be your top priority.

Dogs are no different, they need to be treated with respect and understanding and sometimes human expectations are too high, they don’t think like we do, they are, after all, a different species. Please watch the The Family Dog, stop the 77 video below.

Parents, educators & dog owners have a responsibility to teach children and adults how to act and behave when in the company of dogs. Both kids and adults need to know about basic dog safety and awareness, because for the most part, children under the age of 12yrs are the one’s who get bitten. Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of adults who get chomped on, as well.

Even if you are not a dog owner, everyone needs to know how to act and behave when in the company of dogs. You may not have a dog but the chances are, you know someone who does.

Below is a very good graphic from family paws, on the 5 types of supervision, it is too easy to get caught up in doing something else and not being aware of what is going on around you, such as talking or texting on the phone or on the computer, chatting or having coffee with friends, the list is endless.

Parents & dog owners, need to do more than just supervise, when children, adults and dogs are together. They need to be watching 100% of the time.

Dogs do talk to us if we watch, observe and listen. They need to watch out for signs of stress in the dog, such as: changes in facial expression, licking of the lips, and the dog’s general demeanour. If you are unsure remove the dog from the situation, it only takes a second for something bad to happen.

5-types-Supervision-LowRes

TV and Movies often portray “The good family dog” but don’t be fooled, these dogs are well trained, and they have trainers on the sets with them. If you want a well-trained and adjusted dog, you have to put the time and effort in. They need guidance, direction and boundaries, as do children.

Even people who have been around dogs all their life’s should Never assume that a strange dog is going to be friendly towards them, remember you may think you know dogs but that strange dog doesn’t know you. It may see you as an intruder or a threat. There are many things that can cause a dog to bite you, so please take the time to read 5 easy ways to get bitten by a dog  and Dog Owners its ok to say NO!

Dog Safety Advice for All

Never leave a child alone with a dog, because a child’s actions may inadvertently trigger an unwanted response, and the child may get bitten.

Never tease a dog. (E.g.: shouting & yelling, barking, throwing things, pulling faces & ears etc). These actions can cause a dog to attack because it may feel threatened or frightened If the dog is confined in a yard or tied up it will not forget the teasing, and if the opportunity presents itself, it will get its own back.

Always ask the owner’s permission before petting a dog. If the owner is not around leave the dog alone. If it is a stray dog, stay well away.

Never run away from a dog and Never run away screaming and shouting, because a dogs natural instinct it to chase and catch its prey.

Never enter a yard with a dog in it; always ask permission from the owner.

Never stare into the eyes of a dog, the dog may see it as a threat or a challenge to fight.

Always approach dogs calmly, carefully and slowly. Let the dog see and sniff you that’s how they get to know you and never approach a dog from behind.

Dogs like to play rough, they don’t have hands like you or I, and they jump up and use their mouths to grab hold and hang on. So do not jump, wave your arms around or scream when playing around dogs, these actions excite and stimulate the dogs chase response.

Never play with a dog unless supervised by an adult.

If you are approached by a strange dog stand very still and remain calm. Don’t scream and shout, stand sideways and don’t stare, that tells the dog, via body language, that you are non confrontational, then slowly move away, by taking small steps, if you can.

Never approach a strange dog. (You will never know what it will do).

Never put your hand through a fence or a window of a parked car to pat a dog, because it will bite you.

Never disturb a dog that is eating, sleeping, or caring for pups.

Never try to separate dogs that are fighting.

If you are knocked over by a dog, Always protect your face, arms & neck and roll up into a ball and remain very still.

If you get bitten tell an adult.

Never put your face close to a dog.

Never hug your dog or any dog around the neck because you may trigger the dogs bite reflex and the dog will bite you.

Children should not take their dog out for a walk unless accompanied by an adult, because if a situation arises e.g.: encounter with a stray dog, children don’t have the strength or presence of mind, to act quickly enough.

Be careful when handling a dog who is in pain or injured, it may bite you. Always, take precautions.

Always, try to be relaxed and calm around dogs, erratic movements could startle a dog or they may think you are teasing them.

Never take your dog on someone else’s property without finding out first, if it is OK to do so.

Fast-moving outdoor athletes should keep a safe distance between them and dog walkers. (E.g.: joggers, Cyclists etc). Again, these actions trigger the dog’s natural chase response.

Never run or walk up behind a dog, (even one you know) and try to pat it. Always, let a dog know you are there, let it see and sniff you.

Below is another very good info graphic from Doggone safe, although it says holiday tips, these tips can keep everyone safe year round.

holiday bite prevention tips

More information with graphics can be found @ http://www.zerobitesdogtraining.com/bittenP1.html
Also take time to read the NZ herald Dog Attack feature
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/dog-attacks/news/headlines.cfm?c_id=575

 
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Posted by on January 19, 2016 in About

 

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Do Dogs Bite Out of the Blue?

Do Dogs Bite Out of the Blue?

Very good article, and again a must read. Will help to reduce the number of reported dog bites and the many more that are not reported. Dogs do talk to us but we have to watch and listen. 77% of dog bites are caused by the family dog or friends dog. If you can’t be watching your dog a 100% of the time, when around children or adults for that matter, remove the dog or people from the situation. As dog owners its our job to watch out for our dogs and teach kids and adults how to act and behave when in the company of our dogs or anyone else’s for that matter.

Dogs and Babies...Learning to Live Happily Ever After

Heads Up!…I’ve moved this blog to my new website:  DogsandBabiesLearning.com.  You can find this post and comments through mid-November here.  If you are subscribing, commenting, linking or sharing, please do so from the new website.

I prepared this slide for my Dogs and Babies – Play It Safe! class as a way to illustrate one reason why dog bites to children might seem to happen “out of the blue.”

Before thinking more closely about it, we tend to think that “Good Dogs” live on the left side of the continuum and “Bad Dogs” live to the right.  That’s because good dogs don’t bite children, do they?  Once you determine that you have a “Good Dog,” you tend to leave it at that and just go about your life with dog and baby.

What we forget to consider is that just like us, dogs have good days and…

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Posted by on January 14, 2016 in About

 

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Gaston Bessette, Photographie

La passion de la photo-Photographs as a passion

Ōrphic Flux

Tales of Wandering Souls

Wandering With Words

Random musings of a reckless soul.

EWIAN

Independent audiovideo artist

My Botanical Garden

Tamara Jare contemporary painting blog

The Cheesesellers Wife

Anything and Everything, but mostly Poetry

Doublewhirler

iPhone vs Camera

My Blog

My WordPress Blog

RALPH SMART - INFINITE WATERS DIVING DEEP

Become Your Greatest Version

GlobeTrotters: When Pig's Fly

Travel, Fitness, Northern. Three of the finer things in life! Join me in exploring the globe and telling a funny story along the way with a little piggy

Love Travelling

Travel diaries providing inspiration for planning the perfect trip

Travel

Live Your Dreams Don`t Dream Your Life

cancer killing recipe

Just another WordPress.com site

Violet's Vegan Comics

Vegan Children's Stories

The Daily Viewfinder

Living creatively through a lens