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Travelling with Dogs: Pet Survival Kit

Travelling with Dogs: Pet Survival Kit

Sorry, the Zombie Apocalypse isn’t upon us but natural disasters, power cuts, undrinkable water or no water, are some things we are all familiar with, and could happen at anytime.

Our pets are important to us, so it stands to reason we should have provisions put aside for them, also.

If the power or roads were out, or you had to leave your home quickly, for whatever reason, are you prepared? As it can be a stressful time for all, including your pets.

Below is a list, of some of the main all seasons items, I personally have for Holly.

Have at least enough supplies to last for one week, or maybe longer. The more pets you have, the more supplies, you will need.  While the list below may seem daunting for some, you don’t have to rush out and buy everything at once, shop around, don’t get caught up in all the hype and pay over the top for pre-packaged kits.

In fact, many of the items listed below, you probably already have more than one of. So just put any spares in your pets bag. Check out these links, Travelling with Dogs: Pet First Aid and Travelling with Dogs: Hot Days, Cool Dogs, for more items you may wish to add.

1. Water, make sure you have enough for a week.

2. Food, Buy some canned food or pouches and before many of you throw your hands up in horror and say “I am not feeding that”. Canned food or pouches have a higher water content, so they will reduce the amount of the water, your pet will need. A good idea is to buy some for your pet to try, to see what he/she likes or doesn’t like.

Keep in mind, if you feed a total dry food diet. your pet will need more water and don’t forget to include a can opener (non electric) in your kit.

3. Proof of ownership and vaccinations, ID Tags, papers etc

4. Spare leads/collars etc and some form of portable containment or tie out

5. First Aid Kit: Travelling with Dogs: Pet First Aid

6. Medications, if your pet is on any medication, make sure you have enough, so stock up.

7. Contact list, boarding kennels, friends, vets. (have them written down in a note book, not just on your phone)

8. Toys, blankets, towels, coats and anything to keep your pet happy.

9. Bowls for food and water, portable bowls are also a good option, as they are lighter and can be packed away, when not in use.

10. Pet waste Bags (poop bags)

11. A bag to store your pets kit in

Pet Survival Kit infographic by Pooching Around

 
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Posted by on November 13, 2018 in About

 

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Your puppy needs to be fully vaccinated, before attending class. What does this mean?

Your puppy needs to be fully vaccinated, before attending class. What does this mean?

I am not going to go into the pros & cons of vaccinating your dog and what it entails, as there is plenty of information out there (do your research) and if you are not sure about something, ask your vet.

I train dogs in the Ashhurst Domain and other public areas, the Domain for example, is open to the public 24/7 as are many other parks and reserves. It is also a high traffic area, meaning people, dogs, (vaccinated or not) vehicles etc, can come and go as they please.

In other words it is not a controlled environment. So the risk, of your, not fully vaccinated puppy contracting something, is greater.

If you do decide to take your puppy out, it may or may not contract something but that is the risk you take and the choice, you make.

What does fully vaccinated mean? it means by the time your puppy reaches 14 – 16 weeks of age, it should have had, all its shots and be fully vaccinated. Of course, as with anything, there are exceptions.

Now I hear you say, what about socialising, or my puppy is doing this and that, what do I do?

Well if you know someone who has a fully vaccinated dog and the dog, is mellow and chilled, you could introduce your puppy to him/her OR you could attend a puppy pre-school, where you will find puppies of similar ages, up to 4 months.

Puppy pre-schools are often run by your local vet but look around and see what is available in your area.  These classes are held in a “controlled environment” and the puppies your puppy will meet, will be at various stages, on their vaccination schedule.

I hope the above has helped clear up any confusion some people may have had, regarding the term “Fully Vaccinated” and what it means.  Many obedience classes, boarding kennels and the like, require dogs to be fully vaccinated.

Are puppy classes enough?  There are no quick fixes when it comes to training your dog

A poem from an untrained puppy  Socializing your dog

 
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Posted by on October 5, 2018 in About

 

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Dog Training Q & A to some frequently asked questions & queries

Dog Training Q & A to some frequently asked questions & queries

I thought I would do a Q & A page to answer some commonly asked questions and queries I frequently receive. This page will be updated as more Q & A are added.

Q 1.  Do you offer a performance guarantee?

Sorry no, I do not. When it comes to dog training, there are too many variables, I have no control of, to offer any kind of guarantee. Dog training is all about me teaching you how to handle/communicate and train your dog. Your dog may listen to me but your dog isn’t my dog, you have to do the work.  I can only advise, guide & show, I can’t make you listen and take note of my advice or suggestions. Neither can I make you work and spend time with your dog as required, on a daily basis.

Although, I can ask you to let me know, if something I have shown you, isn’t working for you, I can’t rely on you telling me. Dog training is about commitment,  there are no quick fixes when it comes to training your dog.

Trades people such as plumbers, mechanics etc, may guarantee their work and guarantee’s apply on most consumer  goods, eg cars, TV’s, fridge/freezers and the like. As with any written guarantee, you need to read the fine print, re conditions that can make guarantee null & void.

Some dog trainers may offer a guarantee, it maybe just a gimmick, to increase their client base, you need to read the small print.

Q 2. Are you a dog whisperer?

Dog whisperer is a phrase,  which has been used quite frequently since Robert Redford movie the “Horse Whisperer” was released in 1998. it was based on the 1995 novel “The Horse Whisperer” by Nicholas Evans.

In fact, All animals speak to us, if we as humans, choose to watch, listen and learn. So, no, I am not a dog whisperer but like many other people I can read and understand dogs and what they are trying to tell us.

Many dog trainers/behaviourists, over the years have used the phrase “dog whisperer”, as a good marketing tool, to increase their client base and revenue.

Q 3. Do you only hold “group dog training classes” on a Sunday?

Yes I do, I find for most people, the time and day is more convenient.

Q 4. When is your next Canine Parkour Class (urban agility)?

I am sorry but due to the lack of interest, I no longer hold Canine Parkour classes. I do however include an introduction to canine parkour, in my group classes and private training packages. I also offer a one hour private parkour training session, to anyone who is interested.

Q 5. Hi, just wondering when your next Pet Support Group meeting is?

Again, unfortunately due to the lack of interest, I know longer offer this free service.

Q 6. Do you train when its raining?

Yes I do, I train in all weather, unless it is extreme, or there is a possibility of someone getting injured e.g. Its a very windy day and there’s bark or branches breaking off trees and being tossed around, by the wind.  They have the potential to harm. So I will cancel, I usually contact people via phone or text. So, if the weather is a bit crappy, don’t assume I am going to cancel.  If you don’t hear from me, its still on.

 Q 7. Why do your classes cost more than the dog training clubs?

Volunteer club members, run the classes and they only charge a nominal amount to cover their basic costs. That is why their courses run for longer and cost less. Unlike myself and many other trainers, we have to cover our costs and live.

 

 
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Posted by on May 5, 2017 in About

 

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Another article to add to the arsenal against BSL, time to wake-up New Zealand.

Another article to add to the arsenal against BSL, time to wake-up New Zealand.

This article was posted online back in 2013 by The Telegraph. The article was written by Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent 3:21PM GMT 03 Dec 2013.

“Bad dog owners to blame for aggressive animals not their breed”

New research suggests dogs which have been deemed ‘dangerous’ and banned by the government may have been wrongly stigmatised because they are prized by bad owners…”

To read the full article click here

Just another article to add to the arsenal against BSL,   yet New Zealand, still insists on going forward with BSL.

Also read:

A big thumbs up NZ for the lack of imagination and foresight and daring to be different.

Dog safety advice for all (not just kids) most dog bites are preventable

 

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2017 in About

 

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Making a Dog Safety difference in 2017! How many people involved with dogs. Vets, dog trainers/behaviourists, pet shops, etc. discuss & hand out dog safety information, to their clients?

Making a Dog Safety difference in 2017! How many people involved with dogs. Vets, dog trainers/behaviourists, pet shops, etc. discuss & hand out dog safety information, to their clients?

Now, this suggestion may or may not be popular and yes it will not reach everyone but its a proactive start.

How about anyone involved with dogs.  All dog trainers, vets, pet shops and behaviourists  hand out information and discuss basic dog safety and the dog control act with their clients? It’s easy enough to make up FAQ sheets.

I have just put together a one stop dog safety resource page. Titled: Dog Safety Advice for all (not just kids) most dog bites are preventable.

There are different coloured links to videos, articles & graphics. All information is free to use. All information is copyright so a mention or link to the various authors of the graphics, articles & videos including ZeroBites Dog Training, would be greatly appreciated.

I have been a advocate of dog safety education, including the Dog Control Act for years.

To that end I have been discussing and handing out information on both, to my clients for a very long time.

I’d be interested to hear from any trainer, club, vet who is doing this as well, apart from myself.

We as educators have a opportunity to make a difference and maybe along the way,

prevent someone from getting bitten and save a few dogs, a one way trip to the vet.

We are on the front lines so to speak, we can make a difference! We have the opportunity to be part of the solution, and if we do nothing, are we passively contributing to the problem?

 Rescues, SPCA, Plunket and the like, are on the front lines also, they like us, have a great opportunity to educate their clients about dog safety, keeping both dogs and people safe.

It would be good, if we could all in a small way, help turn the tide in 2017 and try to reduce, by education, the number dog bites/ dog attacks in NZ.

Again, hopefully along the way, prevent someone from getting bitten and save a few dogs, a one way trip to the vet.

Another link you maybe interested in reading:

A big “Thumbs Up NZ” for the lack of imagination & foresight and daring to be different. The new proposed dog control laws, leave a lot to be desired.

 
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Posted by on January 24, 2017 in About

 

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Dog Parks, Good or bad idea?

Dog Parks, Good or bad idea?

I am personally not a great fan of dog parks because when many dog owners (not all) see the sign “Dog Park” they think it gives them the right, to let their dogs, run amok with no consequences.

Dog Parks are specifically designed for dogs and their owners but they are no different, to any other Public Park that allows “Off Leash or On Leash Dogs” when it comes to the “Dog Control Act”, Manners & Etiquette, Common Sense and dog owners being aware, of where their dog is and what it is doing. Dog parks are not for all dogs.

Dogs like humans, can become stressed, distressed, fearful, overly excited or aggressive. While others may be bullied or be bullies.

Dogs need their owners to stand up, protect and watch out for them, even at the dog park. Same as you would look out for, and help a human friend, if they were in trouble or needed any kind of help.

All dogs speak to us, if we as humans choose to watch, listen and learn. If your dog is aggressive a dog park isn’t the place for it, same can be said if your dog is a bit nervy or fearful. Also, bitches on heat need to be kept away from any park.

I personally believe, dog parks should have information on dog park manners, etiquette & rules, posted by the gate entry, to the park, of what is expected from dog owners and their dogs, so everyone can have an enjoyable time, at the park.

In some states in the US they have compliance officers randomly visiting parks. They have the power to issue on the spot fines, if dog owners don’t have their dogs under control, in other words, their dogs are causing a nuisance or are problem. Also, in some US states, dog owners who wish to run their dog, off-leash are required to apply for an off leash licence. Food for thought NZ

Some of you may think I am anti off-leash dogs, in fact I am not, I am only anti dog owners, who do not have their dogs under control. Whether it be a dog park, park, beach, reserve or the like. If it is open to the public, everyone has the right to be there and enjoy their day, without being harassed by someone’s dog. Not all people love dogs, not all dogs, love other dogs, and so on.

I do believe, dog parks should have, separate areas for both small and big dogs, so they can  run around and play safely. Some big dogs may see smaller dogs as prey and may kill them, if given the chance. Before anyone throws their hands up in horror, it happens! Same may happen in a boarding kennel/doggy day care environment, if small and big dogs are run together.

That is why it is so important to have someone physically present, watching the dogs behaviour, at all times.

Below are a few links to articles and information on Dog Parks and Off & On-leash Pros & Cons.

Dogs off leash but not under control    Dog Park Etiquette  Canine Parkour (urban agility)

Off Leash Dogs in Public Areas: No Manners, Common Sense or are some just confused!

Socializing your dog, the right way        At the Dog Park The Importance of Participating

Three Dogs Who Shouldn’t Be at the Dog Park or Daycare   10 best dog parks in the US

When is a Dog Park not a Dog Park? When its a Public Park or Reserve!

Robin Bennett – The Keys to a Positive & Safe Dog Park Experience

 
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Posted by on November 8, 2016 in About

 

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A big “Thumbs Up NZ” for the lack of imagination & foresight and daring to be different. The new proposed dog control laws, leave a lot to be desired.

A big “Thumbs Up NZ” for the lack of imagination & foresight and daring to be different. The new proposed dog control laws, leave a lot to be desired.

This will probably be, my first and last article I write on this subject because quite honestly, its enough to make a person pull their hair out, in frustration and disgust.

I am not going to get caught up in the fray and ramble on emotively, there are plenty of people out there, who without a doubt, are more qualified at emotive and unproductive rambling, than I.

The number of dog attacks/ bites have been slowly increasing over a number of years, there are many reasons for that, the theme however always seems to remain the same.

NZ has a spate of reported dog attacks/bites.  Reports in the media usually lead to a feeding frenzy of emotive rants, raves & ideas on how to solve the “dangerous dog problem”. This theme seems to be repeated every time a serious attack story hits the media.

Common sense facts and solutions, are what is needed, not emotive rants and raves. I have been an advocate of dog safety education for all (children & adults) for a very long time and I have to say, “Lets get real, is the dog really to blame?”

When I refer to dog safety,  I mean teaching both children and adults,  how to act, behave and stay safe, when in the company of dogs, it’s about teaching and keeping both dogs and people safe. 77% of dog bites come from the family dog or a friends dog. stopthe77.com

Personally, I have found that most dog bites & attacks are caused by inappropriate interactions with a dog. There’s a real culture of “she’ll be right”, or “oh Fluffy wouldn’t bite – he’s bomb proof”. People are complacent and usually not aware of the warning signs.

Indeed in a recent online survey commissioned by Hon Louise Upston  (associate minister of local government) which ran from 1st August 2016 – until 14th August 2016. The need for more education was indeed one of the things identified, yet it seems one of the last things on the “to do” list.

Yet, Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) is often mentioned.  For those of you who don’t know what BSL is, it’s laws or legislation based on the breed your dog is, or in some cases what people think your dog is if you’re not sure. Unfortunately, it’s pretty much a quick fix solution that worldwide, is known not to work! However, it has the potential to cost a lot of dogs their lives. So why look at adopting it? Is it to placate the uneducated & uninformed, while trying to curry favour, with the general public?

 Why not, dare to be different, how hard can it be, to research and maybe try something new.

For example take a look at: How Calgary reduced dog attacks without banning pit bulls  Briefly, they changed from the “standard animal control model” to a “responsible pet owner model” education is a big thing, all schools are visited every year, dog owners are urged to get training for their dog if problems arise and so on. Read the article, it is food for thought.

In a recent article published on Radio NZ web site 23rd September 2016 an article titled:

Dog law change would make dangerous breeds extinct in NZ :

Mr Les Dalton (Institute of Animal Management president) said the new measures were well overdue.

“It’s something that needed to be done. We’ve had far too many children being mauled by pit bull-type dogs and dogs that had the content of the wrong breed in them. Would you put your grandchild or little daughter or little son in the lounge with a pitbull and leave them alone with the child?”  A very emotive statement, to say the least.

Maybe, Mr Dalton needs to be taught some basic dog safety education. You should never leave any dog, irrespective of the breed, alone with a child or even some adults for that matter. (dog safety 101, folks!)

All dogs can bite, even “GOOD WELL TRAINED DOGS” if they are teased, hit, abused or put in situations THEY find uncomfortable. People need to be taught how to act and behave when in the company of dogs. “All animals speak to us, including dogs, if we as humans, choose to watch, listen and learn”. Dogs need us to protect & respect them.

Having a well trained dog isn’t enough, basic dog safety/dog bite prevention, should be taught in all schools, while I know in some areas of NZ, it is being done. I am also aware  “Funding” is an issue. If NZ wants to turn the tide and is serious about reducing the dog bite statistics, make the funding available.

The old saying, “talk is cheap, put your money where your mouth is, or shut the bleep up” springs to mind.

Now, this suggestion may or may not be popular and yes it will not reach everyone but its a proactive start.

How about anyone involved with dogs.  All dog trainers, vets, pet shops and behaviourists  hand out information and discuss basic dog safety and the dog control act with their clients? It’s easy enough to make up FAQ sheets or even print something off the internet and hand them out. I’d also be interested to hear from any trainer, club, vet who is doing this, apart from myself.

 Also, rescues, SPCA, Plunket and the like, are on the front lines so to speak. It’s a great opportunity to educate your clients and help turn the tide.

Even “GOOD HUMANS” will react if they’re pushed, teased or threatened – so why do we put our pets in potentially life threatening situations?

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on October 18, 2016 in About

 

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