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Dog Training Classes, Ashhurst Palmerston North start Sunday 26th November @ 1.30pm, min class size 3, max size 6, means more time spent with you and your dog. “Book Now” to secure your place.

Dog Training Classes, Ashhurst Palmerston North start Sunday 26th November @ 1.30pm, min class size 3, max size 6, means more time spent with you and your dog. “Book Now” to secure your place.

Dog Training Classes with an expert dog trainer and behaviorist The course is very comprehensive and unlike others, covers more than just dog obedience & dog behaviour.

Small classes max no 5, Min 3, so you will learn more and I can spend more time with you and your dog. unlike some of the larger classes.

To secure your place, Book Now! Start: Ashhurst Domain, Palmerston North, Sunday 26th November 2017@ 1.30pm. Suitable for dogs of all ages.

Classes are kept, as age appropriate as possible. I will teach you how to handle your dog in real life situations.

The course teaches you: How to Effectively communicate With Your Dog & How Dogs Communicate With Each Other. Commands: Sit, Stay, Recall, Down, Social Walking (loose lead/heel) Stand, Leave It (visit Turid Rugaas link on this blog to gain a better insight on how dogs communicate, with each other). Covers Minor Behaviour’s Such As: Jumping Up, Digging Holes, Pulling On The Lead etc

My aim is to also promote dog safety & awareness so this class also covers: How to socialize your dog, the right way. Basic dog behaviour & safety around dogs & people/Dog bite prevention, Responsible Dog Ownership/Dog Control Act, Introduction to Canine Parkour (Urban Agility)

Making a dog safety difference in 2017, most dog bites are preventable. It would be great if we could all in a small way help, turn the tide and try to reduce, through education, the number dog bites/ dog attacks in NZ.

Hopefully along the way, prevent someone from getting bitten and save a few dogs, a one way trip to the vet.

Course cost: $110 (FAQ sheets included) runs for 4 weeks (4 x 1 hour sessions) For more information visit: http://www.zerobitesdogtraining.com/BLT.html  or fill out the form below.

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Posted by on November 3, 2017 in About

 

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Another article to add to the arsenal against BSL, time to wake-up New Zealand.

Another article to add to the arsenal against BSL, time to wake-up New Zealand.

This article was posted online back in 2013 by The Telegraph. The article was written by Sarah Knapton, Science Correspondent 3:21PM GMT 03 Dec 2013.

“Bad dog owners to blame for aggressive animals not their breed”

New research suggests dogs which have been deemed ‘dangerous’ and banned by the government may have been wrongly stigmatised because they are prized by bad owners…”

To read the full article click here

Just another article to add to the arsenal against BSL,   yet New Zealand, still insists on going forward with BSL.

Also read:

A big thumbs up NZ for the lack of imagination and foresight and daring to be different.

Dog safety advice for all (not just kids) most dog bites are preventable

 

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2017 in About

 

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How do I keep my dog happy, When walking isn’t her no 1? Flash Dog Training Special, (Blog Only) 6pm Friday 27th – 6pm Sunday 29th. Manawatu Region Only

How do I keep my dog happy, When walking isn’t her no 1? Flash Dog Training Special, (Blog Only) 6pm Friday 27th – 6pm Sunday 29th. Manawatu Region Only

Today most dogs have lost the jobs they were bred and born to do. Dogs like humans they need mental stimulation, otherwise they may  become bored, destructive, depressed or stressed.

Although walking your dog is good exercise, a bit of mental stimulation, will help keep them happy as well as, tire them out.  Mental stimulation can help them focus and listen to you more and if the weather is really bad, you can keep them occupied at home.

End result, a happy tired dog and we all would like our dogs to be happy.

Welcome to my new flash monthly, dog training special post. Every month I will be offering for 2 days only, blog only special. To take advantage of any of the flash specials. The form below needs to be filled out and emailed to me, within the time stated above.  Training will be held in the Ashhurst Domain, Palmerston North.

So to kick off January 2017, I am offering a 1 hour introductory class for $10. Limited numbers, Maximum no 6. Class will commence on Sunday 5th February @ 11.30am.

Titled: “Enrichment games for your dog” These games also mean lots of FUN for you and your dog and can be played around the home or when you are out and about. We will be looking at scent games & canine parkour as well as interesting things to do with milk bottles and ice cream containers.

This class is not suitable for dog aggressive dogs. However, aggressive dogs can benefit greatly, so if your dog is aggressive, I am more than happy to teach you and your dog privately. (cost $40) 

 
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Posted by on January 26, 2017 in About

 

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Making a Dog Safety difference in 2017! How many people involved with dogs. Vets, dog trainers/behaviourists, pet shops, etc. discuss & hand out dog safety information, to their clients?

Making a Dog Safety difference in 2017! How many people involved with dogs. Vets, dog trainers/behaviourists, pet shops, etc. discuss & hand out dog safety information, to their clients?

Now, this suggestion may or may not be popular and yes it will not reach everyone but its a proactive start.

How about anyone involved with dogs.  All dog trainers, vets, pet shops and behaviourists  hand out information and discuss basic dog safety and the dog control act with their clients? It’s easy enough to make up FAQ sheets.

I have just put together a one stop dog safety resource page. Titled: Dog Safety Advice for all (not just kids) most dog bites are preventable.

There are different coloured links to videos, articles & graphics. All information is free to use. All information is copyright so a mention or link to the various authors of the graphics, articles & videos including ZeroBites Dog Training, would be greatly appreciated.

I have been a advocate of dog safety education, including the Dog Control Act for years.

To that end I have been discussing and handing out information on both, to my clients for a very long time.

I’d be interested to hear from any trainer, club, vet who is doing this as well, apart from myself.

We as educators have a opportunity to make a difference and maybe along the way,

prevent someone from getting bitten and save a few dogs, a one way trip to the vet.

We are on the front lines so to speak, we can make a difference! We have the opportunity to be part of the solution, and if we do nothing, are we passively contributing to the problem?

 Rescues, SPCA, Plunket and the like, are on the front lines also, they like us, have a great opportunity to educate their clients about dog safety, keeping both dogs and people safe.

It would be good, if we could all in a small way, help turn the tide in 2017 and try to reduce, by education, the number dog bites/ dog attacks in NZ.

Again, hopefully along the way, prevent someone from getting bitten and save a few dogs, a one way trip to the vet.

Another link you maybe interested in reading:

A big “Thumbs Up NZ” for the lack of imagination & foresight and daring to be different. The new proposed dog control laws, leave a lot to be desired.

 
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Posted by on January 24, 2017 in About

 

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Dog Parks, Good or bad idea?

Dog Parks, Good or bad idea?

I am personally not a great fan of dog parks because when many dog owners (not all) see the sign “Dog Park” they think it gives them the right, to let their dogs, run amok with no consequences.

Dog Parks are specifically designed for dogs and their owners but they are no different, to any other Public Park that allows “Off Leash or On Leash Dogs” when it comes to the “Dog Control Act”, Manners & Etiquette, Common Sense and dog owners being aware, of where their dog is and what it is doing. Dog parks are not for all dogs.

Dogs like humans, can become stressed, distressed, fearful, overly excited or aggressive. While others may be bullied or be bullies.

Dogs need their owners to stand up, protect and watch out for them, even at the dog park. Same as you would look out for, and help a human friend, if they were in trouble or needed any kind of help.

All dogs speak to us, if we as humans choose to watch, listen and learn. If your dog is aggressive a dog park isn’t the place for it, same can be said if your dog is a bit nervy or fearful. Also, bitches on heat need to be kept away from any park.

I personally believe, dog parks should have information on dog park manners, etiquette & rules, posted by the gate entry, to the park, of what is expected from dog owners and their dogs, so everyone can have an enjoyable time, at the park.

In some states in the US they have compliance officers randomly visiting parks. They have the power to issue on the spot fines, if dog owners don’t have their dogs under control, in other words, their dogs are causing a nuisance or are problem. Also, in some US states, dog owners who wish to run their dog, off-leash are required to apply for an off leash licence. Food for thought NZ

Some of you may think I am anti off-leash dogs, in fact I am not, I am only anti dog owners, who do not have their dogs under control. Whether it be a dog park, park, beach, reserve or the like. If it is open to the public, everyone has the right to be there and enjoy their day, without being harassed by someone’s dog. Not all people love dogs, not all dogs, love other dogs, and so on.

I do believe, dog parks should have, separate areas for both small and big dogs, so they can  run around and play safely. Some big dogs may see smaller dogs as prey and may kill them, if given the chance. Before anyone throws their hands up in horror, it happens! Same may happen in a boarding kennel/doggy day care environment, if small and big dogs are run together.

That is why it is so important to have someone physically present, watching the dogs behaviour, at all times.

Below are a few links to articles and information on Dog Parks and Off & On-leash Pros & Cons.

Dogs off leash but not under control    Dog Park Etiquette  Canine Parkour (urban agility)

Off Leash Dogs in Public Areas: No Manners, Common Sense or are some just confused!

Socializing your dog, the right way        At the Dog Park The Importance of Participating

Three Dogs Who Shouldn’t Be at the Dog Park or Daycare   10 best dog parks in the US

When is a Dog Park not a Dog Park? When its a Public Park or Reserve!

Robin Bennett – The Keys to a Positive & Safe Dog Park Experience

 
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Posted by on November 8, 2016 in About

 

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Lets get real, Is the dog really to blame?

Lets get real, Is the dog really to blame?

Well, I feel like I am a broken record saying the same thing over and over again, when it comes to Dog Safety and how to stay safe around dogs.

The reported dog attacks over the last few weeks here in NZ, are certainly a cause for concern but are the dogs really to blame? Easier to blame the dog than the owner or the person who was supposed to be supervising because they can’t stand up for themselves and tell their side of the story.  Dogs don’t just bite, most bites are the caused by inappropriate behaviour by adults and children   as well as people not seeing and reading the dogs warning signs. All too often the dog pays the price, with its life.

77% of dog bites come from the family dog or a friends dog and a good percentage of the victims are children. Many, not all, of these bites stem from inappropriate greetings and play as well as, dogs being generally put in, bad situations

While it may be good the media report and highlight these instances they fuel the fire but we “the public” very rarely get to hear the full story.

In my opinion, there are 3 things which have greatly contributed to the rise in dog bites/attacks over the last few years in both children and adults. 77% of dog bites come from the family dog or a friends dog and a good percentage of the victims are children. Many, not all, of these bites result from inappropriate greetings and play.

1. Human Complacency.

People feel too comfortable & secure and don’t see or are unaware/oblivious to the potential dangers living with a dog can bring. Dogs have been put on a pedestal, too much is expected of them. They have to act and behave and be good dogs, in any given situation. As if humans would do the same, if the roles were reversed. Dogs are not human they don’t think the same as we do, they need to be treated with respect and understanding. After all we are living with an animal that can move faster than us in everyway, who has teeth that can do a lot of damage and in many cases is stronger than us.  If I were not talking about a dog but another animal, say a Tiger, Horse or even a Cat, would people be so complacent?

2.  A she’ll-be-right attitude, which is quite self explanatory

3. People looking but not seeing.

Lack of supervision, supervision for many  these days means taking a quick glance around at what the dog, kids or other adults are doing while chatting on the phone. working on the computer, having coffee with friends maybe even in another room, going for a walk with your dog and not paying attention to what is going on around you. The list is endless. If you can’t be watching 100% of the time, its quite easy to remove the dog or person/people from the situation, and if you are out walking, leash your dog.

By looking and not seeing, you are not seeing if your dog is, being teased, harassed, bullied or is or is frightened, stressed or distressed. All animals talk to us including dogs, (via body language) if we choose to watch and listen. As humans, we won’t tolerate being teased, harassed or bullied, so why should dogs?  As humans, we may feel frightened, stressed or distressed at times and what do we do?   We seek help, comfort, support, so why not help, comfort and support, dogs. After all they are supposed to be mans best friend, so dog owners need to become educators  so they can teach others including non dog owners, how to act, behave and communicate, when in the company of their dog or anyone else’s.

So what do dogs need from us? they need love, boundaries, rules, guidance, protection, consistency and a safe place to call their own, a place they can go, to have a break, from kids, you, your friends, other dogs and to just chill. They need time spent with them on a daily basis. They need you to understand them and stand up for them, when they are unhappy, stressed, frightened or are being teased, harassed or bullied. They need you to look and see and not to be complacent, and not to be afraid to say NO to that child or adult or even another dog & owner, if their behaviour is unacceptable. Remember, dog owners its ok to say “NO”

Always remember, its your dog, your house, your rules and when you are out its your dog your rules.

These days there is a lot of information about dog safety out there and there is no real reason why people should not be, well informed. I often hear “my dog is good with kids” (maybe be good with your kids but not someone else’s) “my dog won’t bite”(any dog will bite given the right set of circumstances) “my dog is a good dog” even good dogs bite if they are teased, hit, abused or put in a bad situation.

I personally hand out dog safety information along with the training FAQ sheets to all my clients. If they are new expectant parents I cover that also. I find myself now teaching people how to protect themselves when they are out walking, with or without their dog, from unwanted attention from off leash dogs, which in reality, I shouldn’t have to  be doing.

If we want to turn the tide and reduce the number of dog bites/attacks maybe its time that all dog trainers/behaviourists, training clubs, vets who run puppy schools, private trainers, SPCA, Rescues, Schools and Plunket get on board and provide basic dog safety information to their clients, children and parents. All people, (children & adults)) whether they are dog owners or not, need to know how to act and behave when in the company of dogs. All dogs speak to us, if we choose to watch and listen.

 
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Posted by on May 9, 2016 in About

 

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Keep those Doggies Rollin’……Rawhide, Rawhide!

Great and informative article and a must read for all those who feed rawhide chews and bones.

I used to give my dogs rawhide treats which they loved (mainly the bones) but I stopped doing that a long time ago. I personally found after they had chewed them for a while, the bones became soft and they would break off the knots, which were not as soft. More often than not my hand ended up in their mouths, to prevent them from choking, trying to dislodge and retrieve these knots,

Even smaller pieces of rawhide, when chewed, to become soft and pliable can get caught at the back of a dogs throat, they can find it very hard to dislodge and possible choking can occur.  If larger knots and the like are swallowed they also may cause blockages in the gut.

The Science Dog

I have always hoped that someday I would find a connection between the Blues Brothers and dog nutrition. That day has come.

Rawhide, Rawhide: A dog person cannot walk into a pet supply store (or their own grocery store, for that matter) without noticing the explosion in the number of dog chews, dental devices and edible bones that are available for sale today. Some of these are biscuit or extruded concoctions containing a mixture of ingredients, while others originate from cow skin (rawhide chews) or are the left-over body parts of a hapless food animal (pig/lamb ears, hooves, and bully sticks).

If you do not know what a bully stick is, ask your mother. Better yet, ask your father.

rawhide knots    Bully Sticks   Pig ears  Hooves

Even as the selection of these items has expanded, nutritional information about them is still glaringly absent. Since all of these products are intended to be chewed slowly so that pieces or the entire produce will be gradually consumed by the dog, we should at least be informed…

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Posted by on March 28, 2015 in About

 

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