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What do you think, are puppy training classes enough?

What do you think, are puppy training classes enough?

Click on the image ” A poem from an untrained puppy” to enlarge and read

What do you think, are puppy training classes enough?

Puppy training classes can be a great start to socializing and training your dog if run correctly but that is all they are, just a start.

Usually classes are run for four weeks and only take dogs up to 4 months of age. They cover the basics in behaviour and training but very few, cover anything in-depth.

They do not prepare the owner for the problem behaviours that often occur in the “teenage period” which usually starts around the 6-7 month mark and can continue until the dog is 15-20 months old, this time frame can vary depending on the dog.

Young dogs are quite pliable and can be easy to teach, owners often say to me “he is such a good boy/girl, does everything I tell him/her” but four weeks of puppy training is not enough to in-still basic training in a dogs mind.

Many not all, puppy schools, do not teach/tell you the owner, about the benefits of having good leadership skills, in other words, what you need to know and do, to ultimately have a well rounded  dog, who is a joy to have around.

Dog owners expectations can often be set too high, they expect too much too soon and this can result in them becoming, frustrated, angry, tired, and unhappy with themselves and their dog. Sometimes they forget the reason, why they even got a dog, in the first place.

Dog training, takes commitment, consistency, repetition, time, patience (its not all smooth sailing) and a great sense of humour. There are no quick fixes, when it comes to training your dog. Its not a chore but a labour of love but that is sometimes, forgotten.

I often chat to owners who are having problems with their dog and they say “We took him/her to puppy training”. Which is great but its not enough.

Good leadership skills are the key. After all, there is more to training than just “Sit and Stay”. It can be really hard without any guidance, and while Google and helpful friends may give you some advice, that advice may or may not, be helpful.

Not all dogs are the same, and what tricks and tips, work for one dog, may not work on another.

Classes should give you a good grounding and help set you up for life. That is why its is important to continue on, with some form of obedience and enrichment.

Canine enrichment, is important because today most dogs have lost their jobs, they were born and bred to do. As well as exercise, they need to have their brains stimulated and used, which in turn can tire them out. Exercise and enrichment can help elevate boredom, reduce behaviour problems or eliminate them altogether, depending on the problem.

Other articles you may find helpful if you want a happy well rounded dog. 

Dog safety for all (not just kids)  Signs of stress in dogs: is your dog stressed?

Boarding Kennel Stress: Things owner need know!   Socialising your dog the right way

 
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Posted by on November 27, 2018 in About

 

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Signs of Stress in Dogs: Is your dog stressed?

Signs of Stress in Dogs: Is your dog stressed?

This infographic, 20 signs of stress in Dogs, is provided by topdogtips.com click on the link to read, more detailed information.

Some of these signs may also indicate some other underlying health or behavioural issues (same as with any human illness), so keep it all, in context.

Dogs like to know where they are in the scheme of things, they are happy when they have rules, boundaries, routine, exercise, fun, consistency and a space to call their own. The lack or change to any of the above can cause problems for them. All animals speak to us, including dogs, if we as humans, choose to watch, listen and learn.

Signs-of-Stress-in-Dogs-1

 

 

 
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Posted by on November 22, 2018 in About

 

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Moving On: House for Sale, Photography, Travel & Adventure are calling!

Moving On: House for Sale, Photography, Travel & Adventure are calling!

Well, its time for a change, Photography, Travel & Adventure are calling. So my house has to go.

My group dog training classes and private training, will still continue in the Ashhurst Domain, until my property is sold.

I will then, unveil my new dog training & behaviour, training options.

Holly (my dog) & I are looking forward to the adventure & challenges, this new lifestyle will bring.

Click on the link to see more information, photos etc and contact: Jude @ Property Brokers, Woodville,  if you or anyone you know, maybe interested.

 

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Posted by on November 19, 2018 in About

 

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Breakout Dogs: Escape the yard again.

Breakout Dogs: Escape the yard again.

 

 

 

 

Breakout dogs: Escape The Yard Again

Freedom waits under the fence,

Dig a bit more dirt, then we’ll be done,

Now we’re off, to enjoy our day,

Sniffing and barking along the way,

Hey neighbour, do you want to come and play?

 Jump the fence, and we’re away,

Across the road is the park but dodging cars, left its mark,

No more digging, under the fence for me,

Chasing butterflies or being free,

 Dodging cars, was the death of me.

– Elayne Hand

I know most dog owners, have probably been there at one time or another, your dog escaping off your property, I know I have, it happened only once and never again.

Dogs are smart, once they learn how to get out, they will continue to do so, unless you fix the problem.

The reality is, for your dogs safety and your peace of mind, good containment is a must. Basically, your property isn’t secure if your dog can escape, under, over, or through, any form of containment you have, for your dog.

If your fences are too low, and your dog is a jumper, extend them, if your dog is a climber, put brackets (similar to prison fencing, pic below) on the top of your fence, leaning inwards towards your yard, and cover with wire, (not barbed wire, ordinary fencing wire chain link or the like). While a cat maybe able to climb and get over the fence, a dog may fall and land on its back and injure itself because unlike cats, dogs don’t land on their feet.

If you have holes in your fence, fix them, if your dog is a digger, you have a few options, you can lay a boundary containment wire around your property, and your dog wears a collar, if it goes too close to the fence, the collar can vibrate or shock.  You can also, bury the likes of chicken wire or bricks/stones under the fence, cover with dirt, so when your dog tries to dig, it will hit the wire or brick/stones.

Lastly, make or buy a kennel & run, the size is up to you, if the run has an open top, put shade cloth/wire or the like over the top, so your dog can’t jump or climb out.

If you are one of those dog owners who think, it is cruel to have your dog contained, while you are at work or out for the day, or you just can’t be bothered to fix your fences. Maybe a dog isn’t the right pet for you, owning a dog, comes with responsibility.

Recently posted RNZ article,  Dogs’ owner fined after 14 sheep killed

I am not going to go into detail of the responsibilities of dog owners re: The Dog Control Act, its online for all to see. I am however going to mention dog owners, social responsibilities.

Not all people like dogs, some are afraid of them, there’s nothing worse than a stray dog, bounding up to a person, who doesn’t like dogs. They may feel threaten, scared or may even think the dog is going to attack them or worse, it may attack them. You can count children, in that equation too.

If your dog is out roaming and wandering around and causes a traffic accident, you could be liable for the damages, let alone the pain and suffering your dog may have caused. Lastly, your dog maybe left bleeding and dying on the side of the road, not a pretty sight. (would you want that for your family pet?)

Dog owners, walking their dog, don’t want to have to contend with your wandering dog, while out on their daily walk, because anything can happen.

So if you truly care about your dog and regard them as part of your family, you do right by them, you keep them safe, secure, happy, content, and protect them the best you can, as you would, a human family member.

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Posted by on November 17, 2018 in About

 

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What do you think, Is it dangerous for young kids to walk their dogs, alone?

What do you think, Is it dangerous for young kids to walk their dogs, alone?

Just lately, while driving around, I have seen quite a few young children walking their dogs, alone.

Do I think it is dangerous, yes I do but not for the reasons, some of you may think.

I am all for independence (kids being kids) getting out and about and having fun but when it comes to walking their dogs on their own, with no adult supervision, not so much.

For a good many parents, I don’t think they realise the potential dangers their son/daughter could be exposed to, while out walking their dog.

Some parents would say, “What’s the Big Deal” the “Big Deal” is one of safety, safety of their son/daughter and their dog.

Young children don’t have the strength or presence of mind to act quickly enough, if something bad were to happen.

In fact anyone who takes their dog out has to be aware of their surroundings and what is going on, around them. Have you taught your child to be aware of their surroundings and what is going on around them, if they are out walking your dog, alone?

Young children are not really capable of doing that, due to their age and immaturity.

Whether the dog is big or small, it is still a dog, dogs can run and pull on the leash, if they see something, that peaks their interest.

Even, adults can often find their dogs hard to manage, if it were, to do the same.

Imagine your child casually walking your dog, your dog, starts pull, on the leash, and is intent on running across, that busy road.

Does your child know, how to stop it or to drop the leash and let your dog go? Your dog may or may not make it, across the road. Traffic just can’t stop or swerve, as it may cause an accident. Now imagine if your child, didn’t know how to stop it or didn’t let go of the leash! 

Walking in the park, sounds like fun but “What If” your son/daughter were to meet a stray or off leash dog, do they know what to do?  Do they know what to do, if a dog fight were to ensue?

Many adults, in the same situation can find it hard, distressing and traumatizing, both for themselves and their dog. Which may or may not have, lasting effects.  Do you want your child or your dog or both, distressed or traumatized?  

Also, think about other dog owners walking their dogs, is it fair to expect them to deal with your child and your dog, if it becomes excited or out of control, when its sees another dog. Your child will more than likely, let go of the leash and anything can happen.

Is it fair to let your son/daughter, deal with your excited or out of control dog?

You may think that won’t ever happen to my child, my dog doesn’t do that with me, maybe not, but you are an adult.

Lastly, you may think I am going a bit overboard but I can tell you, these situations I have just mentioned, happen daily, to both children and adults.

Oh and before I forget, another thing your child needs to learn is, how to pick up the Poo:-) There are many more scenarios that spring to mind but I wanted to keep this blog post as short as possible.

A good way of letting your young child walk your dog, is to attach two leads to your dog’s collar, you give your child one lead and you have hold of the other, so you are primarily in control.

For more information please read this very good article: Should children walk dogs?

There are no quick fixes, when it comes to training your dog

 
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Posted by on November 16, 2018 in About

 

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Travelling with Dogs: Pet Survival Kit

Travelling with Dogs: Pet Survival Kit

Sorry, the Zombie Apocalypse isn’t upon us but natural disasters, power cuts, undrinkable water or no water, are some things we are all familiar with, and could happen at anytime.

Our pets are important to us, so it stands to reason we should have provisions put aside for them, also.

If the power or roads were out, or you had to leave your home quickly, for whatever reason, are you prepared? As it can be a stressful time for all, including your pets.

Below is a list, of some of the main all seasons items, I personally have for Holly.

Have at least enough supplies to last for one week, or maybe longer. The more pets you have, the more supplies, you will need.  While the list below may seem daunting for some, you don’t have to rush out and buy everything at once, shop around, don’t get caught up in all the hype and pay over the top for pre-packaged kits.

In fact, many of the items listed below, you probably already have more than one of. So just put any spares in your pets bag. Check out these links, Travelling with Dogs: Pet First Aid and Travelling with Dogs: Hot Days, Cool Dogs, for more items you may wish to add.

1. Water, make sure you have enough for a week.

2. Food, Buy some canned food or pouches and before many of you throw your hands up in horror and say “I am not feeding that”. Canned food or pouches have a higher water content, so they will reduce the amount of the water, your pet will need. A good idea is to buy some for your pet to try, to see what he/she likes or doesn’t like.

Keep in mind, if you feed a total dry food diet. your pet will need more water and don’t forget to include a can opener (non electric) in your kit.

3. Proof of ownership and vaccinations, ID Tags, papers etc

4. Spare leads/collars etc and some form of portable containment or tie out

5. First Aid Kit: Travelling with Dogs: Pet First Aid

6. Medications, if your pet is on any medication, make sure you have enough, so stock up.

7. Contact list, boarding kennels, friends, vets. (have them written down in a note book, not just on your phone)

8. Toys, blankets, towels, coats and anything to keep your pet happy.

9. Bowls for food and water, portable bowls are also a good option, as they are lighter and can be packed away, when not in use.

10. Pet waste Bags (poop bags)

11. A bag to store your pets kit in

Pet Survival Kit infographic by Pooching Around

 
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Posted by on November 13, 2018 in About

 

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Travelling with Dogs: Pet First Aid

Travelling with Dogs: Pet First Aid

I personally carry a first aid/medical kit in my vehicle at all times. I also carry mini first aid kits, in all my bags. I know, it may sound like overkill but I spend a lot of time in the outdoors. I just don’t have myself to think about, I have to look out for my dog Holly as well.  Besides, carrying a first aid/medical kit also enables me, to help others, if the need arises. Better to have it and not need it, than not have it and need it.

Always, carry phone numbers of your vet or local vets in the area, in which you are travelling. (include addresses as well) Don’t just have them on your phone, write them down in a note book. Makes life a whole lot easier. That goes for doctors and medical centres as well.

Many items in a human first aid kit can be utilised for your dog. I make my own kits up, I find it a lot cheaper. You can also buy the commercially available kits and add to them. They of course come in various sizes and are priced accordingly. You can make the kits up, to suit your needs. Its not as daunting as it sounds, if you already have a first aid kit, you are more than half way there.

You can also sign up for a Pet first aid course (NZ) this is one of the few listed on Google, plus there are, many books available on the subject.

I keep, First Aid for Dogs: What to do When Emergencies Happen by Bruce Fogle  D.V.M in my glove box.

Here is a list of just a few things, I have added to my first aid/medical kit.

Muzzle: It doesn’t matter how much your dog loves you or you love your dog, if its is in a lot of pain and you need work on your dog, there is a good chance it may bite you. Its nothing personal.

Nail Clippers: If you don’t know how to use or trim your dogs nails, its a good idea to learn. As your dog may break, crack or damage a nail.

Rescue Remedy: for stress and anxiety, may not work on all dogs. (also good for humans) but isn’t a long term solution.

Blood stopping agent: such as Celox or stypic powder for minor cuts, there are also other products available, on the market. (good for humans as well)

Antihistamine: Bee stings and the like for many dogs are just painful and annoying but for others who have an allergic reaction, it can kill them. Dogs often get stung in the mouth, throat, face or on their feet. If you know your dog is allergic, it should be something you carry with you, at all times. If you don’t know if your dog is allergic, Benadryl is a antihistamine but you have to be careful, over dosing is easy to do, so please check with your vet.

Flea & Worm Treatment: Depending on where you are going or how long you are going to be away, they maybe something, you need to take with you.

Sun block: you may need to have this for your pet also.

Torch: Always comes in handy, you never know when you will need it.

From Bark Post: Here’s What You Need To Do If Your Dog Is Stung By A Bee

Lastly, make sure you have your dog registration, any medication or other medical information with you, but most of all, have fun and enjoy the journey, with your dog.

Travelling with Dogs: Hot Days, Cool Dogs 

Pet First Aid Kits: Do you have one?

How to make a Pet First Aid Kit

 
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Posted by on November 6, 2018 in About

 

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